Hierarchical Précis

Old Testament History Books New Testament History Books New Testament Epistles Old Testament Poetry & Wisdom Old Testament  Old Testament Prophets Psalms Job Proverbs Ecclesiastes Song of Solomon

Psalms - Book 4

[Psalms 90-106]

Psalm 90

A Prayer of Moses, the Man of God. Moses speaks of the eternity of God and the frailty of man toward whom God is showing His displeasure. He states the necessity of considering the shortness of life, and earnestly prays for God’s mercy and for His favour to return to Israel.

Psalm 91

God, my refuge and fortress. The psalmist speaks of how the godly man can feel safe in the shadow of the God in whom he trusts, who will defend and preserve him, trample on his adversaries and respond to his prayers with mercy and deliverance.

Psalm 92

A song for the Sabbath day. It is good to give praise on the Sabbath and to give thanks for God’s works. A fool has no understanding of this. The wicked will perish, but the righteous will be fruitful and flourish.

Psalm 93

The majesty and power of God. God’s reign, clothed with majesty and power, is eternal. God is mightier than any who oppose Him as testified by His works. Holiness is His house, forever.

Psalm 94

A call for justice. The psalmist appeals to God against those who are His people’s oppressors. He warns them that God sees and hears everything and even knows their thoughts. God is merciful to the righteous and will bring them comfort, but the wicked He will cut off.

Psalms 95-100

Some like to group these six psalms together. For example, when commenting on Psalm 97, Barnes says “Perhaps the most that can be said now on the origin and design of the psalm, is that these “six” psalms,    Ps. 95-100 seem to have been composed with reference to the same occasion, and may be designed to be used together. They are similar in their contents and structure; and they refer to the same thing - the sovereignty or the supremacy of God.”

Psalm 95

The writer of Hebrews implies this psalm is by David - Heb 4:3-7. A call to worship and obedience. The people are invited to praise God for His majesty and dominion, and to pray to God, for He is their shepherd and they are His sheep. They are exhorted not to be disobedient as their fathers had been in the desert and consequently not permitted to enter His rest.

Psalm 96

All the earth to sing unto the Lord who will be their judge. In this psalm, all the peoples of the earth are invited to sing in praise of the one true God, to bring offerings and to worship Him. This is to be a witness to all nations and a reminder to all that He is coming to judge the earth.

Psalm 97

God’s majesty and glory. God’s majesty and glory are acclaimed, putting idol worshippers to shame. Those who love God and hate evil can rejoice in the knowledge that He is their deliverer.

Psalm 98

In praise of God. Simply a psalm of loud and joyful praise for God’s salvation, righteousness, faithfulness and mercy.

Psalm 99

God’s mercy and justice. The Lord reigns over all; people should tremble at His great and awesome name. He loves justice as demonstrated in Jacob’s life. Reference is made to Moses, Aaron and Samuel as examples of men of old who called upon Him and were graciously answered with forgiveness and mercy.

Psalm 100

A call for praise and thanksgiving. This final psalm of the series (Ps 95-100) is a call for everyone to come before the Lord with a joyful shout and singing. We are His people and the sheep of His pasture, and with acts of thanksgiving and praise we thank Him and bless His name for His everlasting goodness, mercy and truth.

Psalm 101

A Psalm of David: Leading an upright life. David declares he will conduct his affairs with the attitude of a perfect heart. He will set himself against the ungodly and only employ the faithful. This applies not only to his own household, but as king over Israel.

Psalm 102

This psalm has a prefix generally translated as: “A prayer of the afflicted, when he is overwhelmed and pours out his complaint before the Lord.” The writer expresses the miserable state he finds himself in, representative of those in exile. He has every expectation that deliverance will come soon when God remembers His favoured people and hears their prayers. His confidence is in an unchanging God whose promises will be accomplished in the fullness of time.

Psalm 103

God’s abundant love and mercy. This ‘Psalm of David’ is full of emotions of gratitude and praise for what God has done for the psalmist in particular, and for what He does for all who keep his commandments. God’s mercy is everlasting to those who fear Him. All God’s angels, His hosts and all His works are called upon to join in the praise.

Psalm 104

The formation and governance of the world. Some sources attribute this psalm to David. It appears to allude to the first five days of creation: Day 1 vs 2-5 Gen 1:1-5 Day 2 vs 6-9 Gen 1:6-8 Day 3 vs 10-18 Gen 1:9-13 Day 4 vs 19-23 Gen 1:14-19 Day 5 vs 24-30 Gen 1:20-23 The psalmist concludes by expressing his intent to praise God all his life and his hope that sinners will cease to exist.

Psalm 105

God is praised for His wondrous works with Israel. The psalmist exhorts the people to sing praises to God and make known His deeds in dealing with Israel. This psalm is historic in nature and recalls God’s covenant with Abraham, Isaac and Joseph, Jacob’s being sold into slavery and his later rise to power, Israel’s settling in Egypt and eventual bondage, Moses and Aaron’s part in Israel’s deliverance from Egypt, God’s provision for the Israelites in the desert, and His bringing them to the Promised Land.

Psalm 106

Israel’s disobedience. The psalmist praises God for His abundant mercy before offering a prayer for himself. He then confesses the sins of his people and their fathers, recalling their transgressions from history during their time in Egypt, the desert and the land of Canaan. Although they often backslid and rebelled, God heard their cries, remembered His covenant with them and took pity on them. This prompts the psalmist to pray for Israel’s restoration in order that they might once more give thanks and praise to their everlasting God.
Book 1 Psalms 1 to 41 Book 2 Psalms 42 to 72 Book 3 Psalms 73 to 89 Book 5 Psalms 107 to 150 Old Testament  Book 4 Psalms 90 to 106 Collection of Messianic Psalms